Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don’t Try This At Home | NPR

Jared Seehafer wearing his homemade tDCS device.

Jared Seehafer wearing his homemade tDCS device.

Courtesy of Amy Standen

That’s what Jared Seehafer did. He’s a 28-year-old medical device consultant in San Francisco who heads the group.

He made his own tDCS machine using an elastic headband and a couple of electrodes. It’s powered by a 9-volt battery and produces 1 to 2 milliamps of electricity, approximately what it takes to light one small LED bulb.

via Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don’t Try This At Home : Shots – Health News : NPR.

3 thoughts on “Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don’t Try This At Home | NPR

  1. Didn’t he put the anode and cathode wrong? I can’t find that good information where to put the electrodes. I put my 1.5mA tdcs device anode on left temple, cathode 2cm above right eyebrow.

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