Non-invasive brain stimulation cuts time to improve speech in stroke patients

Article goes on to discuss two other studies and their findings.

Crinion’s current work focuses on understanding how tDCS affects the areas of the brain involved in speech production. She paired an fMRI picture-naming study with a 6-week-long tDCS and word-finding treatment study to see if brain stimulation could improve stroke patients’ speech both immediately after treatment and three months later. In the picture-naming task, people were presented with pictures of simple, everyday words such as car and asked to name them as quickly and accurately as possible.

The results support other studies that tDCS can speed up word finding in both healthy older people and stroke patients, and are helping to identify which parts of the brain should be stimulated. “My work supports the idea that excitatory tDCS could be applied to the stroke hemisphere to optimize recovery,” Crinion says. At the same time, she cautions, one type of treatment may not fit all patients, and further work will clarify whether some patients may also benefit from treatments targeted at the brain hemisphere not affected by stroke.

via Non-invasive brain stimulation cuts time to improve speech in stroke patients.

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